Windermere Reflections – Industrial Archaeology publication

Cover of the popular publication for the Windermere Reflections Project

Cover of the popular publication for the Windermere Reflections Project

The popular publication we produced for the Windermere Reflections project has now come back from the printers.  It will shortly be available to purchase directly from the Lake District National Park Authority. Whether you are interested in community archaeology, industrial archaeology or the history of Windermere and the wider Lake District in general it is worth having a look at.

The book concentrates on the surveys and excavation undertaken in the Windermere catchment over the last few years as part of a Heritage Lottery funded project. Themes covered in the publication include metal mines, slate quarries, bloomeries, fulling mills and woodland industries. There is even a picture of me on the back!

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Excavation of a Viking-Age Cemetery at Cumwhitton

I thoroughly recommend purchasing this book, as it is a great piece of work by OA North on what is one of the most important Viking sites to come up in Britain over the last few years.

Heritage Calling

Little did Peter Adams know, when he pulled a metal object from the ground in 2004, that he had made one of the most exciting discoveries in Viking-age archaeology in England for many years. He had been metal-detecting, with permission, on farmland to the west of the quiet village of Cumwhitton in the Eden Valley and, until then, it had been a fruitless search.

The object was reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme and proved to be a brooch that was identified as a rare Viking oval brooch of ninth – or tenth – century date. These are mostly found in pairs and in a burial context. He therefore returned to the site and did, indeed, find a second brooch.

One of the oval brooches found by Peter Adams. © Oxford Archaeology Ltd One of the oval brooches found by Peter Adams. © Oxford Archaeology Ltd

The Portable Antiquities Scheme commissioned Oxford Archaeology North to investigate the site as it was under immediate…

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Slag exposed in test pitting at High Stott Park, Windermere

Slag exposed in test pitting at High Stott Park, Windermere

We have just set up a new blog at Oxford Archaeology North to encompass all of the investigations, (survey, geophysics and excavation) that will be undertaken on the four potential medieval bloomery sites located around Windermere in the coming few weeks. The project is being run in conjunction with The Lake District National Park and the National Trust.

http://windermerebloomeries.wordpress.com/

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Welcome

Hi there and welcome to my, as yet, pretty empty blog. This is just a quick post to explain how the blog got started and where we go from here.

Snowdonia Ale please!

As an introduction I would say I have been slogging my way out in the wild since 2001, for the most part undertaking landscape archaeology projects in northern England and Wales (with a bit in Scotland) . In all of that time, as with every other archaeologists, I have often been asked the questions ‘Have you found any treasure?’, closely followed by ‘Have you been on Time Team?’, and between gnashed teeth I can honestly say negative to both questions. That is because I look at lumps and bumps on the ground, rarely picking up my trowel in anger to ineffectually prod at the earth. I look for any surface evidence of past human activity that has left tangible archaeological monuments, settlements, field-systems, and in some instances whole landscapes behind. That is mostly not what Joe Public understand as ‘Treasure’ but with a bit of explanation about landscapes that often changes their perception and I get a ‘Wow that sounds like a really interesting job!’.

Being an arch procrastinator, and not the greatest self-publicist I have shied away from letting people know the ins and outs of all the varied and interesting jobs I have done and am in the process of undertaking, as part of my job as a Project Officer working for Oxford Archaeology North. Hopefully this blog will enlighten people to what is happening out there in my corner of the world.