Lovely railway map of the Lake District

Part of the LMS map of the Lake District, at Preston Docks Railway Museum

Part of the LMS map of the Lake District, at Ribble Steam Railway Museum

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We’ve set up a dedicated blog for the forthcoming excavations on the longhouses in the Duddon Valley. I will post some more when it is fully up and running. Apologies for the exclamation mark!

via Welcome to the Duddon Dig blog! — Duddon Dig

Cairn Holy II, Neolithic Chambered Cairn, Dumfries and Galloway

Portal and chamber at Cain Holy II

Portal and chamber at Cain Holy II

Cairn Holy I, Neolithic Chambered Cairn, Dumfries and Galloway

Facade at Cairn Holy I

Facade at Cairn Holy I

Community Archaeology in Lancashire next week

RHYDDINGS PARK LEARN TO DIG

It’s been a while since I last posted, naughty me! I’m going to be out next week helping with some preliminary work for a community archaeology project in Oswaldtwistle, Lancashire. I will post some more info when we get started.

More photos of Helmsley Castle, North Yorkshire – Autumn 2014

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A bitterly cold autumnal morning near Helmsley Castle, North Yorkshire

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Careworn objects seen at the Ribble Steam Railway

Detail of British Railways signs

Detail of British Railways signs

Well where has the long extended summer of 2014 gone now? Unfortunately I have been an infrequent poster on here over the last few months what with work, traveling all over and getting things written up back in the office. Now that the nights are drawing in I will try to post some more interesting things that I have seen, or done, and places visited this summer.

For starters here are some more images of our May 2014 visit to the Ribble Steam Railway based in Preston. I liked the shiny refurbished exhibits with their bright coats of paint sat in what is a great little museum collection, but I often find the rusty, dusty and careworn items much more interesting. Maybe I should take up urbex for a hobby?

 

 

Shiny things at Ribble Steam Railway

Black - Green - Blue -Turquoise - Blue - Green

Black – Green – Blue -Turquoise – Blue – Green

We took the little ones down to the Ribble Steam Railway based on the docks in Preston at the end of May. There was a steam day and a teddy bear’s picnic event going on over the weekend. We have lived relatively close to the railway for many years and I have seen the sign for it in passing but I never realised how extensive it was. The track is quite short, being only a fragmentary remnant of the dock-side railway at the now redeveloped Preston Docks. The exhibition building is massive though and you can also go around the dusty and rusty workshops too. As with most industrial heritage/archaeology museums there is a stark contrast between the bright and shiny things and the dilapidated and rusty things. Here are a few more images of the shiny/colourful things.

Allan Bank, Grasmere – Garden Survey Report

The house at Allan Bank, Grasmere, under renovation in January 2012

The house at Allan Bank, Grasmere, under renovation in January 2012

The historic garden survey report we completed in 2012 for Allan Bank, a National Trust property (and brief residence of William Wordsworth) located at Grasmere, Cumbria is now available online via the OA Library. This project recorded all the archaeological and historical features within the c 4.6 hectare gardens on the property in order to inform the future management of the estate. The work was completed in advance of remedial works to be undertaken before the gardens were opened to the public.

Allan Bank, Grasmere in 1861

Allan Bank, Grasmere in 1861

Deeds record the sale of the land at Allan Bank located above the head of Grasmere by a Mr Sawyer to a Mr Edward Partridge in 1756. In 1804 Mr Partridge, or his descendants, sold the property to John Gregory Crump, an attorney and merchant of Liverpool. Subsequently, a villa was built at Allan Bank between 1805-8 in a simple Classical style, and was positioned on the southern flank of a rocky shoulder dividing Easedale from the main Vale of Grasmere. The house was raised artificially to create the depth for cellars and it was orientated so that the main south front looked straight down the length of Grasmere. A few years later William Wordsworth and his family moved there as soon as it was completed as it’s first occupants between May 1808 and May 1811; and their literary friends Thomas de Quincey and Samuel Taylor Coleridge stayed with them for lengthy visits.  He did not like living there, but needed to move to more ample accommodation than their previous dwelling at Dove Cottage. Their occupation of the property was short-lived, in part, due to complaints about smoky chimneys.

Stone tunnel at Allan Bank, Grasmere

Stone tunnel at Allan Bank, Grasmere

Stone viewing seat at Allan Bank, Grasmere

Stone viewing seat at Allan Bank, Grasmere

The extant remains comprise three separate garden areas: a large wilderness garden; a walled kitchen garden; and formal gardens adjacent to the house. The survey identified, and recorded, a total of 109 archaeological features and/or garden components.  Elements in the wilderness garden consist of a series of sinuous pathways with rustic flights of steps constructed of stone slabs. There are four/five garden seats located at strategic spots within the garden which variously had panoramic views looking north-west onto Helm Crag, south-east to Grasmere lake and east towards the house, although many of these vistas are now obscured with mature trees. Water was managed in the garden, with a reservoir that probably served the house and an underground pipe followed the footpath towards the house and ran through an elaborate stone-vaulted tunnel. Streams have been canalised and one stream passes over a craggy waterfall and has a small pool beneath. There is also a small well within rustic stone retaining walls. Features pre-dating the construction of the wilderness garden include charcoal burning platforms and two sections of relict boundary walls.

Plan of Allan Bank gardens, Grasmere – south

Plan of Allan Bank gardens, Grasmere – south

The kitchen garden has a large slate-topped unheated fruit wall on the northern side, which would have masked the garden from the house. The garden was laid out into quarters by slate-edged pathways and in the centre are the remains of a stone circular structure that may have functioned as a formal focal platform. There is a slate-roofed garden shed, a ruined twentieth century greenhouse, water troughs, a compost heap and a French drain that drained water away from the waterfall in the wilderness garden.

Plan of Allan Bank gardens, Grasmere - house area

Plan of Allan Bank gardens, Grasmere – house area

The formal pleasure gardens form a discrete area running around the house and extend to the kitchen garden; its elements consist of driveways, a dwarf-kitchen garden terrace, containing rectangular flowerbeds, and a sundial. The west, south and east sides of the house have stone-lined flowerbeds and stone-hewn flower boxes. On the west side of the house is a small garden lawn with relict beds/pathways evident. It is enclosed on the west side by a sinuous retaining wall constructed of cyclopean boulders and there is a large rockery constructed of quartz stones. Land to the south of the garden has been landscaped/terraced but its function is unclear. The formal gardens are skirted on the west side by a curvilinear gravelled trackway that runs towards the kitchen garden.

Rock art panel at Allan Bank, Grasmere

Rock art panel at Allan Bank, Grasmere

To the east of the house is a gravelled drive adjacent to the main house entrance, grass-covered tennis courts and a stone outcrop with rock art motifs. On the north side of the house there are the remains of two external buildings, an elaborately decorated chapel or billiard room and the ruins of a small garage or coach house.