Long Meg and Her Daughters Stone Circle, Cumbria – Part Two

Long Meg and Her Daughters - 3D view of Long Meg

Long Meg and Her Daughters – 3D view of Long Meg

This post is concerned with the photogrammetric survey strand of survey that we undertook (see first post) as part of the Altogether Archaeology project at Long Meg and Her Daughters stone circle near Penrith, in the Eden Valley, Cumbria.

In this instance we undertook to photograph 33 of the 69 individual stones consisting the stone circle, and including the Long Meg monolith itself. This process was undertaken by the Altogether Archaeology volunteers who photographed each individual stone from the ground, and by taking shots from above using a photographic mast. The intention was to take photographs from all around the stones so as to provide complete overlapping coverage of each individual stone. The background detail needed to be removed from each photograph and this was achieved both by masking it out on the computer and by having a white background held behind the individual stones during photography.

Long Meg and Her Daughters - photographic recording in action

Long Meg and Her Daughters – photographic recording in action

Altogether Archaeology volunteers were instrumental in going through the various processes using Agisoft Photoscan Pro software to produce nine 3D models of individual stones from the circle. The software combined the photographs, computed the positions that the images were taken from, generated a 3D mesh, and then the photographs were reapplied to the 3D mesh as a texture.  Each individual photograph needed to be prepared, and this entailed masking out of any background detail still left in the photographs, and then the application of survey control. The end product was a series of 3D models that can be viewed as 2D plans or within Adobe Acrobat as 3D pdf files.

Long Meg and Her Daughters - 3D stone

Long Meg and Her Daughters – 3D stone with control points

The photographs of the Long Meg red sandstone monolith came out particularly well as the bright sunlight slanted across the face of the stone containing the rock art motifs and gave sharp definition to the rock strata and any depressions in the surface.

Long Meg and Her Daughters - rock art motifs

Long Meg and Her Daughters – rock art motifs

Again many thanks must go to all of the Altogether Archaeology volunteers who braved the weather to take the photography on site, and to those luckier souls who were based in the nearby village hall processing the data.

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4 thoughts on “Long Meg and Her Daughters Stone Circle, Cumbria – Part Two

  1. Hello, Stephen Read has e mailed me the details of your blog. Just been having a look it looks very interesting. I am a member of Levens History group and had a great time at the Sizergh Dig this year. Talking of Time Team! I always found the work Stewart Ainsworth did the most fascinating, so I look forward to future postings. Thanks for taking the time to set it up, so we can all get our history fix.
    Regards
    Karen Wells

    Reply
  2. Hi Karen,

    I’m glad that you like the look of the blog so far. It is still early days but I will hopefully get lots of landscape archaeology projects posted up on there and keep people up to date with what I am currently doing. Happy reading!

    Reply
  3. Hi Pete,

    what a coincident that both of us blogged about Long Meg at the same time. Thanks for sharing this detailed infos and visiting my blog.

    Greetings from the North Norfolk coast
    Klausbernd

    Reply
    • Hello Klausbernd

      Long Meg and Her Daughters circle is a great place to explore. There are so many interesting prehistoric sites around the same area and if you have not done so I would suggest seeing Mayburgh Henge and the nearby King Arthur’s Round Table.

      Regards

      Pete

      Reply

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